Student Show Celebrates National Arts Education Partnership

feline AIDS buy phentermine hcl 37.5 facial colliculus Who: The Right Brain Initiative and King PK-8 School

femoropopliteal bypass http://littlebabycompany.com/buy-yellow-phentermine-30mg.php buy yellow phentermine 30mg entoectad facial reflex http://littlebabycompany.com/phentermine-get-prescription-online.php phentermine get prescription online factor VIII What: Student art show

http://www.summitlaps.com/dogterra/summit/pack13/then6/ buy clonazepam from india Where: Community Room at North Portland Library, 512 N Killingsworth

http://www.dmassociatesllc.com/xanax-prescription-online-legal.php xanax prescription online legal When: Show on view through Aug. 30, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-07-30 at 9.38.48 PM

Starting Tuesday, July 23, the North Portland Library will feature stunning black-and-white images of local 1st and 2nd graders and their neighbors. All work was produced this spring by students at Northeast Portland’s King PK-8 School during an arts education program facilitated by The Right Brain Initiative.

This display celebrates the partnership between Right Brain, a Portland non-profit arts-in-schools program, and King, one of eight public schools in the nation selected for the Turnaround Arts initiative. Turnaround Arts is a new public-private partnership of the President’s Committee for the Arts and the Humanities, chaired by Michelle Obama. It is determined to boost achievement at some of the lowest performing schools in the country by providing students with full access to high-quality arts experiences.

Right Brain partnered with King this year to provide an essential part of the school’s new arts offerings. Right Brain provided artist residencies to all classrooms and professional development for King staff, which gave teachers tools to naturally integrate the arts into their daily teaching.

“It was an obvious choice to link King School with Right Brain’s dynamic arts programming,” said Katy Mayo-Hudson, the Portland-based Implementation Coordinator for Turnaround Arts. “Right Brain and Turnaround Arts share a commitment to integrated arts education and a belief that creative experiences are non-negotiable for every child. This is a natural and symbiotic partnership.”

The work on view at the North Portland Library was created by 1st and 2nd graders. Partnering with King staff, Right Brain teaching artist and Portland Creative Laureate Julie Keefe integrated the students’ International Baccalaureate curriculum about neighborhoods into a photography project that investigated identity and community. Students interviewed each other and adults from the neighborhood, using portraits and writing to explore how individuals fit within their greater ecosystem.

The program was a perfect match for King School, a community in transition. In recent years, King has struggled with low test scores and student enrollment which dropped from 458 in 2006 to 288. Under the guidance of Kim Patterson, the school’s energetic new principal, King leaders have made the arts an essential part of student learning and community development. Right Brain’s programming has seamlessly supported King’s achievement goals.

The opening reception on July 23 will feature video documentation from King’s first year working with Right Brain. King students and staff, Right Brain leaders and other community partners will be in attendance to celebrate a productive and creative year.

buy klonopin 2mg The Right Brain Initiative is a sustainable partnership of public schools, local government, foundations, businesses and the cultural community, which launched its effort to bring the arts to every child in the Portland area in January 2009. The program’s vision is to transform learning for all children through the arts, creativity, innovation and whole-brain thinking. The Right Brain Initiative is a project of the Regional Arts & Culture Council, with Young Audiences of Oregon & SW Washington serving as Implementation Partner. Read more online at www.TheRightBrainInitiative.org.

http://www.tctfcu.org/pages/extras/cards3/service8/ ambien prescriptions online The Regional Arts & Culture Council is the local arts agency for Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington Counties, providing grants for artists, schools and nonprofit organizations; conducting workplace giving for arts and culture (“Work for Art”) and other advocacy efforts; presenting workshops and other forms of technical assistance; providing printed and web-based resources for artists; and integrating art into public spaces. Online at www.racc.org.

Where does your school stand on Arts Education?

The first step to supporting arts education is understanding your school and/or district’s strengths and weaknesses. Americans for the Arts has developed 15 questions to ask yourself and your education leaders to determine where your school and district currently stand with arts education.

These questions and the benchmarks provided address some of the indicators of a high quality arts program.

  1. http://www.zeitcam.com/docs/assets/cam6/zeit5/ order cheap tramadol online Does your district implement either your state’s instructional standards or  the national standards for arts education?  Benchmark: Standards define what students should know and be able to do in any given academic discipline and are the basis for high quality arts instruction.
  2. Does your school or district have a designated minimum amount of time for instruction in the arts?  Benchmark: One class per week should be the least amount of time—one class per day is ideal.
  3. Is there a high school arts  requirement for graduation?  Benchmark: Many colleges require at least a year of arts study for admission, so make sure that your kids are college-ready by having this requirement in place.
  4. Does your school district have an instructional leader in the arts, such as an arts coordinator? Does s/he need community support to expand or improve the arts program?  Benchmark: If there is no arts coordinator, often the director of curriculum and instruction can serve in this role.
  5. Does your school district have a written arts education policy approved by the school board?  Benchmark: A district policy can protect the arts program in times of budget reductions and administrative changes. If you don’t have a policy, here are  some examples.
  6. Does your school or district have a written plan for the arts program?Benchmark (if yes): ensure that all arts disciplines are included (music, visual arts, theater, dance, and media arts) and that all children in the district are covered by the plan—not just some grade levels at some of the schools. Benchmark (if no): Work with a team of teachers, principals, and community members to put together a plan.
  7. Does your district pay for arts teachers’ salaries and instructional supplies, materials, and equipment?  Benchmark: A good goal to aim for is utilizing five percent of the district’s general budget to cover these instructional costs. Think creatively to utilize other existing funding options, such as: PTA funds, Title I funds for arts integration, Title II funds for professional development, Title III funds for arts-based ESL strategies, Titles I & III for parent involvement programs, grant funds, categorical funds, school site-based funds, community partnerships, etc.
  8. Are school district administrators supportive of the arts program? Bechmark: Support could include any or all of the following indicators: allocation of funding, creation of partnerships with community arts organizations, participation in curriculum development, providing equipment and materials, providing instructional time, providing professional development opportunities, and support for assessment of arts instruction.
  9. Does your school or district have a sufficient number of arts teachers? Benchmark:  Americans for the Arts recommends a teacher:student ratio of 1:400. Portland’s Arts Education & Access Fund guarantees a minimum of 1 certified arts teacher per 500 students in Portland’s six public school districts.
  10. Are certified arts teachers the ones delivering the arts instruction?Benchmark: While certified teachers should be the primary source of instruction, other sources of instruction can include arts integration taught by generalist teachers, or artistic residencies taught by professional artists and/or volunteers. A well rounded program will include a combination of all instructional strategies.
  11. Are professional artists involved?  Benchmark: Professional artists can bring the arts alive during performances and demonstrations at the school. Meaningful partnerships can also evolve between schools and artists through the design of long-term teaching residencies for artists and co-planning between teachers and artists.
  12. Does the arts instruction focus on more than just performing?  Benchmark: A good program will have students not only learning to perform the work of others (such as learning to play Mozart or paint like Picasso), but will also teach students to respond to work (such as appreciation and history classes) and to use self expression to create their own original works of art.
  13. Are there separate arts facilities? Benchmark: Schools should have dedicated space for arts instruction, such as music rooms, an auditorium, a visual art studio, and a dance studio.
  14. Does your school or district have the appropriate resources for arts education?  Benchmarks: Necessary supplies and equipment could include: prints, artifacts, books, videos, slides of art work, computer programs, textbooks, sheet music, art supplies like paint or clay, musical instruments, curriculum units, lesson plans, and resources for field trips or school programs presented by outside organizations.
  15. Is your community involved in arts education?  Benchmark: The community can and should provide additional resources and support to schools in terms of: facilities, volunteers, instructional support, funding, professional development opportunities, field trips, and/or any of the resources listed in the question above. If you find the answer is ‘no’ to several of these questions, work with your principal, teachers, other parents, community members, and the school board to plan for improvement.

Your Advocacy Makes a Difference

Arts Education & Access Fund

Last November, Portland voters overwhelmingly supported the establishment of the Arts Education & Access Fund to restore arts teachers to every Portland elementary school and increase access to the arts citywide. Please join us in advocating that Portland City Council act quickly and thoughtfully to shore up and secure Portland’s new Arts Tax. We want to ensure that it is successfully and efficiently collected and distributed to the classrooms and communities that it was designed to reach. E-mail Portland City Council today and share your perspective on the importance of honoring the will of the voters and investing our tax dollars in arts education and access:

Mayor Charlie Hales         Commissioner Nick Fish         Commissioner Amanda Fritz         Commissioner Steve Novick         Commissioner Dan Saltzman

Why Public Funding for the Arts Still Matters

This week, arts blogger Brian Wise covered a fascinating discussion at the Aspen Insititute about the rise in crowd-funding for the arts and creative economy. In comparing the impact and scope of Kickstarter to the National Endowment for the Arts, this discussion not only showcased the tremendous power of this innovative new revenue stream, it also touched on the essential reason to maintain public funding for the arts – public access to the arts.

As an organization that was founded to establish a new local public fund for the arts to increase public access and to strengthen the long-term viability of the arts, culture and creative communities in Portland, this conversation resonated with us at the Creative Advocacy Network.

Screen Shot 2013-07-09 at 2.48.53 PM

 

Kickstarter vs. The NEA: Which Provides More Arts Funding?

July 7, 2013 by Brian Wise, WQXR

A talk last week at the Aspen Institute reignited a debate that has been circulating in the arts world over the past year: does the website Kickstarter raise more money for the arts than the federal government? And if so, what does it say when a crowd-funding platform beats out the National Endowment for the Arts, a government agency funded by Americans’ tax dollars?

Aspen Institute president Walter Isaacson asked Kickstarter co-founder Perry Chen about number which show that the NEA received a federal appropriation of $146 million in 2012, of which 80 percent went toward grants. During the same time, Kickstarter funded roughly $323.6 million of art-related projects if you include all design, video and technology-related projects. The company has helped raise $600 million toward successful campaigns since its launch in 2009.

“It’s a big deal,” said Isaacson. “In some ways, you’ve invented something that the NEA used to do and can’t quite be now.”

Chen sought to distinguish Kickstarter’s overall goals from those of the NEA, which are more about providing public access to the arts than distributing individual grants to artists. “I like government funding of the arts,” said Chen. “I like more arts and music programs in schools so in no way do we want or hope to be competitive. Private funding of the arts is tremendous. The government pales in comparison.”

But this has long been the case, Chen added. “Mozart did this for a concerto. He had over a hundred people support him. Actually, the first time he tried to fund it, he didn’t raise the money” — he had to try again the next year before successfully funding his work.

As Washington Post columnist Katherine Boyle points out, in 2011, individuals accounted for $13 billion or 75 percent of all giving to arts and cultural charities — far more than corporations or foundations. “Kickstarter, in essence, simplifies the long-held American tradition of individual private donors giving to the arts,” she writes.

When the numbers surfaced in 2012 about Kickstarter’s successes, some took that to mean the company could eventually replace the NEA. Chen sought to praise the agency last week.

“There’s a balance,” said Chen. “Just in the same way we want governments to continue to fund arts, I don’t think we’re advocating for the shutting down of the creative industry.” He added that his hope is that “creators using a model like Kickstarter can get what they’re unable to get from” traditional sources.

Brian Wise covers the classical music business for WQXR, including aspects of performance, technology, philanthropy and institutional trends. He manages the station’s homepage and makes sure what you hear on air is what you see online. Follow him on Twitter at  @Briancwise.

Your Advocacy Makes a Difference

Arts Education & Access Fund

Last November, Portland voters overwhelmingly supported the establishment of the Arts Education & Access Fund to restore arts teachers to every Portland elementary school and increase access to the arts citywide. Please join us in advocating that Portland City Council act quickly and thoughtfully to shore up and secure Portland’s new Arts Tax. We want to ensure that it is successfully and efficiently collected and distributed to the classrooms and communities that it was designed to reach. E-mail Portland City Council today and share your perspective on the importance of honoring the will of the voters and investing our tax dollars in arts education and access:

Mayor Charlie Hales         Commissioner Nick Fish         Commissioner Amanda Fritz         Commissioner Steve Novick         Commissioner Dan Saltzman

Arts for All Fullfills its Promise

On May 8, 2013, at this year’s State of the Arts Report to Portland City Council, a Portland resident, Philip Liu, testified to the importance of making the arts available to everyone, regardless of age or income. Here is Philip’s story and our tribute to Portland’s groundbreaking Arts for All program.

Philip Lui“The first time that we used Arts for All, my son and I went to the ballet to watch Stravinsky’s Rites of Spring. He was four years old. After the show I asked him if he liked it, and – his words – he said, “That was beautiful!” He asked if he could watch it again tomorrow. And we actually went, but it was sold out.

But, from then on we went to as many shows as possible. One of our favorites is going to BodyVox performances. It’s kid-friendly, funny, lighthearted, and at times serious and, and generally wonderful. We both think the performers are like super heroes. (My son) goes to kids classes there now. He’s now six and a half years old.

I had a stroke five years ago. I couldn’t speak for the first couple of months and the only word that I could say was “Yes.” Half the time I meant “No.” I had to relearn “Cat” and “Dog.” And then I went on to relearn arithmetic. And then, a year later, paragraphs, and then reading for a few pages, and then trying to talk to people. And in the many performances, like the Oregon Symphony, BodyVox, Northwest Children’s Theatre and so on, I feel like my body – my mind and body – is healing from the stroke. My son received the same results. Mind, body, and heart healing.

I am on a fixed income. Without Arts for All we would not be able to afford it. Thank you Mayor Hales… and thank you Council Members for investing in arts organizations that participate in Arts for All. Thank you.”

Arts For All

How “Arts for All” Came to Be

In January of 2011, twelve of Portland’s classical music organizations, operating under the auspices of Go Classical PDXand convened by All Classical 89.9, announced a pilot project called “Music for All” offering $5.00 tickets to SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) card holders. Preliminary numbers for the six-month pilot program totaled 1,410 tickets used. Funding for the program was provided by the Regional Arts and Culture Council, Work for Art and the City of Portland.  Plans immediately began to include additional arts organizations in the next iteration of the program and to expand it beyond classical music. The result, “Arts for All” was launched on October 3, 2011.

Arts Education & Access Fund

Your Advocacy Makes a Difference

Last November, Portland voters overwhelmingly supported the establishment of the Arts Education & Access Fund to restore arts teachers to every Portland elementary school and increase access to the arts citywide. Please join us in advocating that Portland City Council act quickly and thoughtfully to shore up and secure Portland’s new Arts Tax. We want to ensure that it is successfully and efficiently collected and distributed to the classrooms and communities that it was designed to reach. E-mail Portland City Council today and share your perspective on the importance of honoring the will of the voters and investing our tax dollars in arts education and access:

Mayor Charlie Hales         Commissioner Nick Fish         Commissioner Amanda Fritz         Commissioner Steve Novick         Commissioner Dan Saltzman