CAN Mail: April 2012 Edition

neurosecretory substance fungsi xanax 1mg niacin Startling new statistics: Portland’s Elementary Schools Report. We thank you for your action.

Last week, CAN released powerful new statistics that showcase how far Portland has fallen behind the nation with regard to arts education. And you responded with a flood of donations and committments to volunteer. We thank you for your action and we share your concern.

Today in Portland there are 11,596 children attending schools that do not have any art, dance, drama, or music instruction.

Please help us break the news and build the movement to restore arts and music teachers to our schools. We invite you to repost or retweet our Blog, share our story in your newsletter or spread the word through your own e-mail networks.

The Creative Advocacy Network has partnered with the City of Portland and Portland’s six school districts to restore arts and music education to our schools and ensure that our children have the same opportunities to imagine and learn and thrive as we did.

Join the movement today and help us keep arts and music alive in our schools.

Grammy award winning jazz vocalist – and Portland native – Esperanza Spalding speaks about the importance of arts education in our schools.
Photo by Flickr User Kimberly_Herbert
neutrophil granule is 1mg of xanax a day safe nevus cavernosus
Students who lack arts education have lower GPA scores.
Photo:
Kimberly Herbert

New NEA study reveals: The arts can close the achievement gap for low-income students.

“At-risk teenagers or young adults with a history of intensive arts experiences show achievement levels closer to, and in some cases exceeding, the levels shown by the general population studied,” a team of scholars writes in a new National Endowment for the Arts Research Report. “These findings suggest that in-school or extracurricular programs offering deep arts involvement may help to narrow the gap in achievement levels among youth.”

This newly published research from the NEA establishes that while students from the lower end of the socioeconomic ladder tend to do less well in school than those from more upscale families, this is not true for those students who participate heavily in the arts.

The primary focus of the report is on teenagers and young adults in the bottom 25 percent of the socioeconomic scale (as measured by family income, parental employment and the parents’ level of education).

“…Students who had arts-rich experiences in high school showed higher overall grade point averages than did students who lacked those experiences,” the researchers write. What’s more, those higher grades paid off. Disadvantaged high school students heavily involved in cultural activities enrolled in competitive colleges — and in four-year colleges in general — at higher rates than their counterparts who avoided the arts.

In Portland, where 56% of our public school students are economically disadvantaged and 41% of Portland’s high school students do not graduate with their peers, this study is particularly relevant.


Cities take the lead in investing in arts education. Boston. Dallas. Seattle.

Across the country, city governments are stepping up to support arts education initiatives in our public schools and communities. The Arts Expansion Initiative (BPS Arts Education Announcement Video) in Boston is a collaboration of the Mayor’s Office, the city school district, arts organizations and local and national funders. And it works. Today, nine out of ten elementary and middle school students in Boston are receiving weekly arts education, up from 67% three years ago.

A similar collaboration in Dallas, Thriving Minds is a citywide initiative committed to making creative learning a part of the education of every Dallas student – in and out of school. Dallas is the only city in the country offering this level of comprehensive creative learning opportunities citywide on a year-round basis, and the support from the City helps makes this possible.

Closer to home, a partnership was developed in 2008 in Seattle between the city, the arts commission, and the public schools to guarantee that all Seattle students benefit from arts education. The City has invested money each year in the partnership, helping to install a district-level music specialist and a community art liaison to coordinate with the city’s arts community.

“We view arts education as a catalyst for renewed energy in schools, increased engagement by students, and improved school choices for families. Over the long term it will enrich our young people, our schools, our neighborhoods, and our economy.” writes Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino.

“Over the long term [arts education] will enrich our young people, our schools, our neighborhoods, and our economy.”
– Boston Mayor Thomas M. Menino.

Portland Falls Way Behind in Arts Education

 

Portland Falls Way Behind in Arts Education
A New National Study Highlights Our Critical Shortfalls

 

Last week, the US Department of Education released its first study of arts education in more than ten years. And while this study reflected what we already know – that arts education opportunities are declining nationally for those who need them most – it also showcased how far behind Portland has fallen.

 

The study found that across the US, 94% of elementary schools offer music instruction and 83% offer programming in visual arts. In contrast, Portland’s six public school districts, which educate over 33,000 K-5 students annually, only provide music instruction in 58% of elementary schools and visual arts instruction in a mere 18%.

 

And the rate of decline for arts education in Portland has been shockingly steep. In the last five years Parkrose and Centennial School Districts have cut their arts and music teaching staff by half, while PPS has dropped all arts instruction in 22 schools in just two years.

 

Today in Portland there are 11,596 children attending schools that do not have any art, dance, drama, and music instruction. With last week’s announcement that 110 teachers at PPS will be cut next year – that number is guaranteed to increase.

 

The Creative Advocacy Network has partnered with the City of Portland and Portland’s six school districts to restore arts and music education to our elementary schools. We are working to ensure that our children have the same opportunities to imagine and learn and thrive as we did.

 

But we can’t do it alone. Please donate $15 or more towards our efforts – today. Join us on Facebook and share this information with your friends, and follow us on Twitter.

 

Together, we can give our children the future they deserve.